Walk and Talk: Health, wellbeing and place, UEA, Norwich – 11/05/17

A ‘Walk and Talk’ event, held in partnership with the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Geographies of Health and Wellbeing Research Group (GHWRG).

All are welcome to join a Walk and Talk around the UEA lake in Norwich to discuss:

‘The relationship between health, wellbeing and place’

Norwich

Set amongst the green of the University of East Anglia campus is the UEA Lake. Join us for a short lunch time walk around the lake through the woods and back up passed the Sainsbury Centre. The walk will offer the opportunity to discuss geographies of health and wellbeing.

Join us on Thursday 11th May 2017 at 12.30pm for a 30 minute walk around the UEA Lake. Meet at the front door of the ARTS 2 building. This will be a relaxed event providing the opportunity to connect with others interested in health and wellbeing.

Contact: Ailie Tam

Download this invitation: Norwich Walk and Talk

Walk and Talk: Health and the Highland landscape, Inverness Campus, UHI – 02/05/17

A ‘Walk and Talk’ event, held in partnership with the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Geographies of Health and Wellbeing Research Group (GHWRG).

All are welcome to join a Walk and Talk to explore the outdoors and talk about:

Health and the Highland landscape – are they connected?

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At the heart of the new Inverness Campus is new parkland that has been designed to
reflect the wider landscape of the Highlands and Islands. Join us on a short walk that will take in the main natural and built features of the outdoor space on campus. We ask those attending to consider what the ‘Highland landscape’ means to you; how you see it reflected in our campus and whether you feel this links to health and wellbeing.

Join us on May 2nd 2017 at 1pm for a 30 minute walk around the Inverness Campus. Meet at the front door of the An Lochran Building (10 Inverness Campus). This will be a relaxed event to connect with other members of the GHWRG and anyone else with an interest in health and wellbeing.

Contact: Sarah-Anne Munoz

Download this event invitation: Highland Walk and Talk

GHWRG Walk and Talk Events

This year the Geographies of Health and Wellbeing Research Group is supporting a series of Walks & Talks across the country. The purpose of the events is to connect local members and get people together to have research or topical conversations in a relaxed outdoor environment; an alternative to a seminar with a spring in its step.

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We will be sharing the locations of upcoming Walk and Talk events on our Twitter and GHWRG website. However, if you are interested in organising a Walk and Talk Event in your area, more information about the format and some helpful tips for organising your event are available: Walks and Talks Tips.

There are a small number of travel bursaries available to help you reach out to other colleagues and members and draw attendance to the events. You may want to plan a large walking event for your region or take a lunch time stroll with colleagues, either way we want to encourage active conversations engaging themes of health and wellbeing across fields, departments, universities and sectors.

Planned events:

Keep us up to date with your Walk and Talk event on Twitter @GeogHealth using #WalkandTalk.

Please contact, Nuala Morse (GHWRG Events Co-ordinator) with any further questions or to plan your own local/regional event.

GHWRG Members’ Survey Report

Between January and February 2017 the Geographies of Health and Wellbeing Research Group conducted a members’ survey  to find out what kind of events and activities members might be interested in attending as well as gauge the scope and diversity of research interests of our growing membership. The exciting diversity of topics our membership is involved with is represented below.

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Following a very positive response by the membership to our proposed Walk and Talk events – aimed at connecting local members and colleagues to have research or topical conversations in a relaxed outdoor environment – we hope to support a number of these events across the country throughout the month of May. If you are interest in organising a local event, please contact Nuala Morse (GHWRG Events Coordinator): Nuala.Morse@manchester.ac.uk

A summary of the findings are available to download as a Word Document and PDF.

PiHG Virtual Theme Issue: Medical and Health Geographies

‘Healthy debate’ and ‘healthy ferment’: Medical and health geographies

The journal Progress in Human Geography (PiHG) has recently carried a virtual theme issue on ‘Health/Medical Geographies’, put together by Chris Philo (University of Glasgow), bringing together 15 arguably seminal papers (including some progress reports) published in the journal over the last c.40 years. It also includes a substantial introductory essay seeking to contextualise the selected papers in terms of how they represent, and in many ways have led or contributed to, key advances in research/scholarhip across the field.

You can access the theme issue here.

 

Blog contributions

Are you starting a new research project? Have you written a paper? Are you organising/attending a conference? Are you trying to make sense of new ideas or work through data?

We would love to hear from you!

We are looking for blog contributions from our GHWRG membership and online community that showcase the diverse and exciting research being conducted in geography of health and health care, medical geography, and any other area of research related to health and well-being.

Posts should be between 300-500 words.

For more information or to discuss possible contributions, please e-mail us at: geoghwrg@gmail.com

 

New paper: Everyday green space and experienced well-being…

Everyday green space and experienced well-being: the significance of wildlife encounters

Landscape Research

Authors:
Sarah L. Bell, European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter

Michael Westley, School of Art, Design and Architecture, Plymouth University

Rebecca Lovell, European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter

Benedict W. Wheeler, European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter

Abstract: A broad and growing evidence base suggests the potential for time spent in natural environments to promote human health and well-being. Whilst evidence of such benefits is rapidly accumulating, we still know relatively little about the role of wildlife encounters in shaping the well-being potential of people’s routine green/blue space interactions, particularly amongst non-specialists. This article addresses this conceptual gap, drawing on the findings of a three-stage, qualitative, interpretive study which sought to understand and situate people’s natural environment well-being experiences within their everyday lives. Wildlife encounters were emphasised by study participants in the context of four types of well-being experience: social, immersive, symbolic and achievement oriented. These are explored within this paper, before discussing the influence of past experiences and current life circumstances on participants’ wildlife relationships. Consideration is also given to how environmental managers might focus activity and investment to balance opportunities for such wildlife experiences with the ongoing priorities of delivering socially inclusive, ecologically rich and climate change-resilient green spaces.